Setting Income Goals for Your Side Hustle

Setting Income Goals for Your Side Hustle from KrissiDriver.com

If you’re thinking about starting a side hustle or own a fledgling business, you might be so concerned with the day-to-day that you forget to plan for the future. But if you don’t have a road map in front of you, how will you know where to go? It’s important to set goals for your business to keep yourself on track, especially in regards to income.

Setting income goals for your business will help you achieve sales and find clients beyond what you ever thought possible. However, if you set random goals without strategic planning, you’ll risk throwing off your trajectory. 

Here’s what you need to know about setting income goals for your side hustle. 

 

1. Set business goals first.

Before you can set an income goal, you need to know what to expect from the business itself. Where do you see your side hustle a year from now? Five years? Ten years? There’s no shame in keeping a side hustle as just a hobby for a little extra pocket money, but if you want it to become your full-time job, you need to set some business goals as well as income goals.

In order for your business to grow over time, you’ll need ways to “scale.” This is a term that’s thrown around often in the entrepreneurial world and it’s often misunderstood. When we’re talking about “scaling” a business, we’re not talking about starting or even growing a business. “Scaling” means being able to take on more work without sacrificing much in terms of income or in other areas, like time management or working yourself to death.

Brainstorm additional products or services you can offer in the future as your business expands. If you anticipate hiring other team members or contractors, how many, and when? Will you want to offer any special bonuses to your team? All of these will factor into the income goals you will need to set in order to succeed. 

 

2. Check your history. 

Next, take a look back at your business’s sales over time, if any. How much money have you been making so far? What seems realistic to expect for next month or next year if things stay the way they are? 

If your projected income based on your sales at this point isn’t as high as you hope, don’t worry. This is just an estimate of what you can expect if your business continues at the level it’s currently functioning at. Your goal should be to grow! 

 

3. Factor in expenses. 

For this step, we’ll need to look to your past as well as your future. What have your expenses been so far? Don’t leave anything out, no matter how small. Even the tiniest expenses can add up over time, costing you money and throwing off your estimates. 

Now think about new expenses that you can anticipate as your business scales. Those new hires we thought about in step 1? This is where you’ll need to think about how to pay them. If you want to rent a spot in a coworking space, how much would that cost in your area? Do some research and pull up realistic figures so you’ll know what to expect. 

 

Setting Income Goals for Your Side Hustle from KrissiDriver.com

 

4. Pick an end goal.

After you take those expenses into account, it’s time to think about the fun part: Profit! How much money do you want to be making from your side hustle per year in an ideal world? 

Add your profit to your expenses and factor in some leeway for emergencies. Be sure to take year-end taxes into account, too, based on your country’s taxation laws. You’ll need to pay taxes on your earnings every year.

Add all these things up and the final figure is the amount you’ll need your side hustle to make each year in order to meet your goal. 

 

5. Create milestones. 

By this point, you might have an end goal so large that you can’t imagine ever reaching it. That’s okay! Even the biggest goals can be achieved if you just put one foot in front of the other. The key is to divide your end goal into smaller milestones that are easier to achieve.

You can choose quarterly goals, monthly goals, or even weekly goals if that’s feasible for your business. The key is to match up these income goals with your business goals so you’re growing your business over time. What can you do this week, month, or quarter to find more clients and boost your income? 

 

6. Write it down.

It’s no secret that actually recording your goals somewhere makes it more likely that you’ll actually work toward and achieve them. In fact, it’s science.

Once you’ve gotten much of the background information worked out, write down your goals. I would even go as far as encouraging you to literally write them somewhere you can see them. In this day and age, it’s easy to record something digitally on a spreadsheet, in a Google doc, or an iOS note. I’m particularly guilty of this myself. 

But physically writing things down helps us to better remember whatever it is we’re trying to remember and give it more power. 

Putting these things somewhere you’ll see them often will further reinforce those goals in your mind. You’ll be even more likely to put in the work needed to make things happen. Trust me – it’s made all the difference for me in my business.

 

While setting income goals for your business can feel overwhelming at first, the key is to do your research and use real numbers in order to project the final figure. No goal is too lofty to aim for. 

As the saying goes, shoot for the moon! Even if you don’t hit your goal, striving for greatness will lead to more success than you could otherwise achieve. 

 

Contract vs. Letter of Consent: What’s the Difference?

Contract vs. Letter of Consent: What's the Difference? from KrissiDriver.com

Let's play a compare and contrast game – a contract vs. a letter of consent. Are they the same?

If you’re new to the world of freelancing, you might come across the term “letter of consent” while negotiating an agreement. A letter of consent is one way for freelancers to document an agreement with a new client, but is it the best one? How does it measure up to a legal contract? 

Here’s what you need to know. 

 

What is a letter of consent?

A letter of consent is an informal agreement between two parties. Where contracts are legally binding, letters of consent, or agreement, are not. 

Letters of consent are common in situations where there needs to be only a casual acknowledgment of agreement that something is taking place, usually when the stakes are low. 

For example, a letter of consent for a freelance writer might contain the names of both parties, the nature of the tasks assigned, and the method of compensation. 

Usually, letters of consent are not used in a setting where money is changing hands. While it helps to have an agreement in writing, the client is not legally obligated to follow through on the terms, so you could very easily end up not getting paid for your hard work. 

If you’re a freelancer and a potential client wants you to agree to a letter of consent rather than a contract, think twice. The terms of a letter are not enough to protect you if the working relationship goes south or your client refuses to pay. If you intend to get paid for your work, you should consider a contract instead. 

 

What is a contract?

A contract, on the other hand, is a formal agreement between two parties that lays out the terms and conditions of an agreement. Legally, a contract must contain several elements: A purpose or offer, mutual acceptance of the agreement, the promises each party is offering, and the material terms and conditions, such as payment and deadlines. 

The contract must also be signed by freely consenting adults in their right minds. While a contract must follow a much more specific format than a letter of consent, it’s also legally binding, meaning it offers you recourse if your client does not fulfill their end of the bargain. 

There are many templates online to help you draw up a contract if needed. Contrary to popular belief, a contract doesn’t need to be written or approved by a lawyer to be valid. Of course, if you can have one look it over before you sign, that’s awesome! If not, just be sure to read through anything a client sends you carefully to make sure you agree to the terms.  

 

What's the Difference Between a Contract and a Letter of Consent? from KrissiDriver.com

 

A Contract vs. Letter of Consent

Letters of consent are okay when you’re doing pro-bono work where no money is being exchanged. As long as there are specific parameters in place to determine the amount of work, type of work expected, and what is being offered in exchange, a short letter between the two parties should be fine. 

For example, if you agree to do some work for a client in exchange for promotion or a good reference, a letter of consent is likely all that’s needed. There is still a possibility that one party will not follow through with the agreement, but there is much less at stake than there would be with a paying job. 

When we're talking about actual work for money, however, the safest bet is to go with an ironclad contract that explicitly lays out the work being done, the timeframe it will be done in, whether or not there will be edits made, and how those edits can be requested and returned. You should also cover consequences for nonpayment, such as a late fee for missing an invoice. 

If a client doesn’t pay, you’ll have wasted valuable time that could have been spent on other, more lucrative projects. Even worse, one missed payment can be the difference between paying bills or struggling to get by for some freelancers. 

 

At the end of the day, contracts offer much more protection for freelancers than letters of consent. As much as we all want to trust our clients, nonpayment is unfortunately a very real issue for freelancers across a variety of industries. Always insist on a contract when completing client work. It’s better to be safe than sorry! 

 

5 Things You Can Do to Support “Black Lives Matter” as an Expat

5 Things You Can Do to Support "Black Lives Matter" as an Expat from KrissiDriver.com

As an American expat living outside the US, I’ve felt so powerless and unable to support “Black Lives Matter” movements. 

As a foreigner living in South Korea, the laws about participating in protests is gray at best: Depending on the circumstances, I could risk deportation for taking part in protests – peaceful or not – and the threat of the pandemic has concerned me because of the impact it may have on my job.

I have agonized about what to do and how I can raise my voice and be an anti-racist and an ally for the #BLM movement. I want to be an advocate and I want to participate in an active way.

And the more I thought about it, I realized that though I’m living far away, there are ways I can actively participate in this important time.

Over the last 2 or 3 weeks, I’ve come up with 5 ways I can support “Black Lives Matter” as an expat living overseas.

 

1. Ensure you’re registered to vote in the next election.

So many have (rightly) said in the last few weeks that the best way we can collectively effect change is by using our voices to vote in the upcoming election cycle. 

This has never been more true than now.

For once, it’s so important to know who is on the ticket, what they stand for, what’s in their public history, and whether or not they will truly be the voice of the people.

If you’re an American citizen, check whether you’re registered to vote at Vote.org. They say it takes 30 seconds to check if you’re registered or not… and they’re right. I did it. Thankfully, I’m registered and didn’t need to take any additional steps.

If it turns out you’re not registered, register with your state the Overseas Vote Foundation. The instructions are straightforward (for the most part) and you can take the first steps to ensure you’ll get an absentee ballot.

The one thing I felt was a little confusing when filling in my absentee registration information was which addresses to use. Be sure to carefully check the PDF with your regurgitated information for accuracy and update it immediately if you spot an issue, otherwise, you’ll have to do it all over again from the beginning as the download link expires within 15 minutes to protect your personal information.

Here’s my main advice on this point: DON’T. WAIT. Do it now. With mail taking longer to trek across the globe, none of us can afford to take our time. (I paid to send my absentee registration via express mail because it was the only option I had. It was expensive but I was glad to pay it.)

 

2. Call your state representatives to voice your approval or disapproval of bills working their way through Congress.

Sometimes we forget how easy it is to place calls back home. 

You might ask, “Well, why can’t I just send an email or a letter instead of calling? I live halfway across the world and my hours don’t match up with Congressional business hours.”

In some ways, I’m inclined to agree with you. In others, I disagree. Here’s a great article from the New York Times detailing a few points but the one that sticks out to me most is that it’s far more difficult to ignore a ringing phone than it is to ignore an overflowing email inbox.

 

Calling isn't hard.

In the day and age we live in, it’s no more than a push of a few buttons and doesn’t cost an arm and a leg to make a trans-Atlantic or -Pacific call. Even if you have to pay a bit more for it, it’s worth making a small investment to stay connected.

To keep your costs down, consider buying Skype credits to call and text internationally. The cost per minute is incredibly affordable and you can spend as little as $5-10 (before any VAT costs). This small credit top-up will be enough to cover dozens of calls to Congress.

Alternatively, you may be able to use your cell phone minutes included in your mobile plan from your host country. For example, I have 5 hours of talk time to landlines and cell phones in Korea included in my annual plan that I literally never use. However, I downloaded the OTO Global app for iOS (also available from the Google Play store) which allows me to call US mobile and landline numbers for free and pulls from my mobile plan minutes here in South Korea. Like Skype, OTO Global also sells credit packages to place calls all over the world.

If you’re not in Korea, chances are there’s a similar app in your host country that will allow you to use your local mobile minutes to call internationally. Google it and see what you come up with before spending money.

 

How to Call Your State Representatives and Senators

Once you’ve figured out how to call back home for a reasonable price, you can actually start calling the people who represent you at home. Here are step-by-step instructions for calling your state Representatives and Senators.

 

1. Start by determining who your state Representatives and Senators are. 

If you’re not sure who your state representatives (both in the Senate and House), you can look them up via the United States House of Representatives online directory or the United States Senate directory

I wasn’t before I started writing this, honestly, who my Representatives in the House were. I know Ted Cruz is one of my state Senators because I voted against him in the 2018 midterms – I was a Beto supporter and bought a shirt to prove it!…  Aside from that, I haven’t lived at home for a while and have actually never resided at my “permanent” virtual address, so I had to do my homework. 

There’s no shame in not knowing, my friend. But do your due diligence and get informed.

 

2. Find the right phone numbers to call.

The same websites where you looked up your Senators’ and Representatives’ names will provide you with the right numbers to call to reach their offices directly. 

To make it super easy for you, click here to find contact information for your House Representative’s office. Alternatively, click here to find contact information for your state Senator’s office

If you’re having trouble with that for any reason, you can call the capitol switchboard directly at (202) 224-3121. The switchboard operator will get you sent to the right place. (You’ll need to know who you’re calling for, obviously.)

 

3. Call your state Senators and Representatives.

This is a little nerve-racking, but once you’ve done it once or twice, it will start to feel totally normal. There are a few things to remember when you’re calling:

 

Know exactly what you’re calling about.

State Rep and Senate offices field hundreds of calls every day so it’s vital that you know exactly what you’re calling about. 

 

Have a script ready to help you make the right points.

There are a number of different sources for scripts and many associations who lobby Congress on the regular offer scripts or talking points for free, such as the American Psychological Association. You can also get scripts from organizations like You Lobby and 5 Calls, among others. Google, google, google to find more.

 

Ask to speak directly to the staffer responsible for the issue you’re calling about.

Let’s face it: You’re not likely to speak directly to your Senator or Representative. Instead, you’ll speak to the next best thing – their staffers. There are multiple people who work in your state Rep’s or Senator’s office and not all of them handle all the issues. Your best bet is to speak to the person in the office who fields calls and messages regarding the specific issue you’re calling about so your message doesn’t fall on partially-deaf ears.

 

Don’t request a call back.

According to Refinery 29, it’s better to say you don’t need a reply from your Senator’s or Representatives office so “they can tally you down without having to go through the extra step of adding you to a response database.” This keeps phone lines open and frees up more time to tally down constituent concerns. 

 

Still have questions about calling your state peeps? Check out this helpful article from Vice. 

 

3. Support “Black Lives Matter” financially and donate to worthy causes.

This is obvious: Give away your money. 

There are plenty of worthy causes out there and often, we’re bombarded with reputable opportunities and organizations where we can donate. Right now, though, the #BlackLivesMatter movement needs funds to continue the fight.

You can google “donate to black lives matter” for a long list of charities and organizations or you can simply go give some money right now to the actual organization behind the “Black Lives Matter” movement, ActBlue Charities. Alternatively, check out this extensive vetted list from New York Magazine for dozens of good options.

 

5 Things You Can Do to Support "Black Lives Matter" as an Expat from KrissiDriver.com

 

4. Listen to black voices everywhere you can.

PAY ATTENTION, FELLOW WHITE PEOPLE: It’s not black people’s job to educate us on white privilege or race relations. We need to do better about educating ourselves.

Read books by black authors. (Thanks to our girl, Oprah, and her people for this list.)

Listen to podcasts by black podcasters like “Gurls Talk” hosted by Adwoa Aboah.

Follow black influencers with strong voices on social media, like Rachel Cargle, Johnetta “Netta” Elzie, Charlene Carruthers, and others.

If you’re an aspiring entrepreneur, start subscribing and listening to more black entrepreneurial voices like Rachel Rogers and Chloe Hakim-Moore

This should not be hard. We all need to make an effort to diversify the voices we listen to on a regular basis. I am making this effort myself and have followed all the women I’ve listed above in an effort to open myself to more diverse voices and points of view (read: not white).

 

5. Talk to your family and friends about what you’re learning and doing to make a change.

A couple of weeks ago, I sat down and wrote my parents and sister a very long email about how I was feeling and expressing that I wanted us to talk about the #BLM movement as a family. 

I  pointed out the glaring fact that we didn’t talk about race in our home when I was a kid because we didn’t have to talk about it

I acknowledged that, unknowingly or not, we are very privileged as white people. 

I want my little brothers – ages 16 and 20 at the time of this writing – to understand the role they play as young white men in society and that they subsequently have voices that carry in our society.

 

We need to talk about these things, white people.

We need to acknowledge that the society we live in was built on the backs of – and at the expense of – black slave laborers. We need to acknowledge how those that came before us intentionally put laws and hindrances in place to keep black people from getting ahead in society – from Jim Crow to redlining to segregation in schools and other public places. Watch this YouTube video for a quick history crash course.

And once we’ve acknowledged the existence of these things, we need to start calling our Senators and House Reps and do what we can to change things. 

We need to end police brutality. How? I don’t know yet – but we need to work together to figure it out.

Yes, we need to listen. But we also need to talk. We did this – we created this mess. Now it’s time for us to whatever it takes to make it right.

 

Black. Lives. Matter.

The last few weeks have been so eye-opening for me. I’ve asked myself and those around me tough questions and having uncomfortable conversations. I’m reading more and making an effort to listen more. 

I am committing to calling my state Senators and Representatives more consistently (which is something I’ve never done before) about issues that pertain to #BLM and in an effort to end police brutality. 

I may be away from home, but I’ve also started to realize I’m not powerless even though I felt like I was. I absolutely can support “Black Lives Matter” as an expat.

I hope you’ll join me in doing what you can – whether you’re an American, a Brit, a Saffa, or hail from anywhere else in our beautiful world. This is important. Let’s do something good together.

 

How to Build a Freelance Writing Portfolio

How to Build a Freelance Writing Portfolio from KrissiDriver.com

When you’re looking for freelance writing opportunities, most potential clients will ask to see at least one writing sample before deciding to work with you. For newer freelancers, this can be a huge obstacle. After all, how do you build a freelance writing portfolio before you’ve actually gotten any writing assignments?

Luckily, you have a few different options when it comes to putting together a portfolio of writing samples. Here are 6 different ways you can assemble a freelance writing portfolio without a lot of experience.

 

1. Do some work for free.

While I’m a huge advocate for writers knowing their worth and getting paid for the work they do, when you’re brand-new to the freelance world, it’s not always a bad idea to do a little work for free. A business or website is much more likely to take a chance on publishing your work if they don’t have anything to lose by doing so. 

A great way to do this is to pitch your services to small or local businesses that are looking to expand their online presence. You can offer to write blog posts or web content for them in exchange for being able to use that work in your portfolio later on. 

If you’re having a hard time finding anyone in need of free blog posts or web content, feel free to take the lead! Conduct some research and write a few articles in your chosen niche to have on hand. You don’t have to pitch them to anyone; you just need to make sure they’re well-written and properly edited. 

While some potential clients will ask for links to published writing samples, many just want to see an example of your work to evaluate your skill level and writing voice before they hire you. You can find plenty of freelance work just by showing you’re capable of producing quality writing. 

 

2. Take some low-paying gigs to get your feet wet. 

An alternative to working for free is to accept a few low-paying gigs in order to fill out your portfolio. Fiverr is a great place to look for these types of jobs. Fiverr is an online marketplace where “sellers” offer all kinds of services at varying prices and levels of experience. It’s great for newer writers because it provides some security in terms of ensuring you get paid and don't risk getting scammed or stiffed. 

That being said, Fiverr may not be the greatest place to stay for long. When the platform originated, gigs were literally all just $5 USD (hence the name “Fiverr”) and most sellers offer their services at pretty low rates and most of the jobs you'll likely find there are pretty entry-level, low-paying, and in high demand. Fiverr Pro might lead to more work at better rates, but Fiverr Pro success stories like this one are, in my experience, exceptions to the rule and not the norm.

How to Build a Freelance Writing Portfolio at KrissiDriver.com

You can also check websites like Craigslist or job boards like All Freelance Writing, ProBlogger, and BloggingPro for low-paying or beginner-level writing work. As you apply for gigs and start communicating with potential clients, use your best judgment and try to target reputable people. 

Remember that if something sounds fishy or seems too good to be true, it probably is. Protect yourself by doing the smart thing and walk away if something doesn’t feel right.

 

3. Write for an agency.

Another option is to find an opportunity to write for a digital marketing agency. Many agencies specifically hire newer writers because they want to keep their prices low and less experienced writers can be paid a cheaper rate. 

While you won’t make as much money writing for an agency as if you were pitching clients on your own, it’s a great way to gain a lot of writing experience in a hurry. Agencies usually have clients across a variety of industries, so you can work on your research skills while putting together a diverse portfolio. In the meantime, you’ll be getting paid consistently for your work.

 

4. Guest post on other blogs and publications. 

Finally, you might want to look into guest posting on other blogs or online publications, especially if you have a blog for your freelance writing business that you’d like to advertise. Guest blogging not only gives you examples of published works to add to your portfolio, but also allows you an opportunity to link back to your own website and get your name out there. 

Seek out bloggers in a niche you feel comfortable writing about, then send a personalized email asking if they’d be interested in a collaboration. Mention why you feel that your writing would be a good fit for their website, and include some ideas for what you’d like to write about. 

In the case of online publications, look on business-targeted websites (for example, Business Insider or Entrepreneur Magazine) for instructions on how to pitch to the company’s editorial team and follow the instructions to a “T.” 

With both of these options, the more you can show you did your research, the more likely a blogger or editor will be to give you a chance.

 

5. Use content from your personal blog or public writing account.

Using your personal blog content is a great way to showcase your work! Why? Because it's one of the places your unique writing voice and perspective will shine.

On your personal blog (or Medium profile or Tumblr, etc.), if you have one, you're likely not writing for anybody else. You don't need to try to match someone else's voice and you're probably expressing your own opinions and experiences. All of these things make you YOU and demonstrate your best writing skills. These are things that business owners, hiring managers, and editors are always looking for.

The one drawback to this option is that you're obviously not making any money for your work. But don't let that deter you from continuing to post regularly on your blog or writing profile. This is an invaluable place to let your personality do the talking and separate you from other writers vying for the same gigs.

PRO TIP: Medium is actually a great place to be found and possibly get some online attention. Check out this HubSpot article on how to use Medium effectively and possibly score yourself some exposure.

 

6. Write samples on your own freelance writing website.

You've got your own freelance writing website, right? Perfect. You have some amazing real estate you can put to good use.

While I don't advocate for putting personal stories on your professional website, generally speaking, I do think it's a great place to demonstrate what you can do. You should definitely have a portfolio page on your website with links to articles you've written. You can take it one step further and include a “kind of” blog, too.

Use a section of your website to write some sample articles on topics or niches that interest you. Better yet, write about writing. Here are a few ideas:

  • Write about the differences between copywriting and content writing.
  • Write about the types of writing you specialize in, such as social media posts, email newsletters, blog articles, or white papers, and how businesses can utilize them or why they need to be killing it with these content types.
  • Write about copywriting or content-specific things you're learning or know about to demonstrate your knowledge, such as SEO, email marketing, Instagram best practices, scheduling tools for social media or email, and so on.
  • Write a round-up listicle of things you find important to the success of your budding business – tools, habits, organization, anything you can think of!
  • Do some research, find an article that interests you, and write on the same topic with your unique spin.

 

Not only will these pieces give a clear indication of your understanding of the things you're writing about, but they're also great practice. Writing more makes you a better writer.

 

While working to build a freelance writing portfolio might be a bit of an investment up-front, it’s worthwhile to spend some time assembling work you can be proud of. Not only will these writing samples help you gain experience as a writer, but they’ll also help you land higher-paying writing gigs as you grow in your career. 

 

Freelance Writing Agencies: Good or Bad?

Freelance Writing Agencies: Good or Bad? from KrissiDriver.com

If you’re a freelance writer, chances are you’ve seen job postings or heard about freelance writing for an agency as opposed to going it on your own. Digital marketing agencies usually look for remote copywriters to produce web content and blog posts for their clients. This practice is good for the agency, as it’s usually much cheaper to hire freelancers than to have an in-house writing team. But is it good for the writers as well? 

Before you apply to an agency’s writing position, there are some pros and cons to consider. Here’s what you need to know. 

 

The Drawbacks of Agency Work 

Your agency experience will largely depend on whether the company itself is trustworthy and reliable as well as how they’ve built their business model. There are some unscrupulous agencies out there that will try to take advantage of their freelance writers, especially if those writers are relatively new in their careers. Here are some things to beware of when considering agency work. 

 

Pay from an agency is often much lower than you can negotiate on your own.

Agencies are looking out for their bottom line. They make more of a profit when they pay you less.

While you do get to set your freelance writing rate when writing for an agency, it's rare that you'll get what you ask for. This is especially true when you're starting out (unsurprisingly) as the agency editors will want to “test out” your writing skills and dependability. And even when you do get assigned pieces that come in at your asking rate, the agency is still going to take a cut of your earnings. Agencies like ClearVoice take a 25% commission on your earnings.

Moreover, agencies may have a limit to how high you can set your rate. As you gain more experience, you'll likely outgrow your agency.

Worst of all, some agencies pay close to minimum wage which obviously isn’t enough for most people to live on. Until you’re very experienced, it’s hard to make a lot of money at an agency. 

 

Working for a freelance writing agency can be time-competitive.

I recently started writing for ClearVoice to see what writing for a big agency is like. Once I was finally accepted into their “talent pool” of writers, my first few assignments were sent not just to me, but to a group of other writers. It was a first-claimed, first-won situation – whichever writer claimed the assignment first got it.

That seems fair, but here's the kicker: That first assignment got snatched up in less than a minute. I was online when the email alert came through, checked my account to see what the assignment was immediately, and it was already gone. I've since been offered assignments that aren't floating in a writer shark tank, but that first experience was a shock to me. 

 

You have little or no say in the work itself.

Marketing agencies take on a variety of clients in different industries, even ones you’re not interested in. When you set up your profile, you have the ability to note what industries you're most interested in or comfortable writing for, but that doesn't mean you'll always be matched with the kind of assignments you want.

I recently wrote a piece about 90s fashion trends coming back into style… And frankly, that's not a niche I'm interested in! I wouldn't have chosen it for myself.

With what I call the “lone wolf” freelance option, you’re not working with a middle-man agency but finding gigs on your own. You have more opportunities to seek out niches you want to write about and pitch to those kinds of clients. 

 

Freelance writing agencies can be incredibly fast-paced.

Agencies often must turn content around on a tight deadline. This is even more alarming when you have literal seconds to be the first to accept an assignment. You may barely have enough time to really review what you've been offered before you accept it.

To top it all off, you may only have a day or two to produce the work they need, which doesn’t allow for a lot of editing time. To succeed at an agency, you need a keen eye for detail and must be able to produce high-quality work on a limited schedule. 

 

 

Benefits of Writing for Agencies

On the flip side, there are plenty of agencies out there that would be great to work for. Plenty of writers choose that path. Ethical agencies can be a great way for writers to bring in a regular paycheck. Here are a few of the unique benefits of writing for an agency: 

 

The work is consistent.

Freelancing can be unpredictable. If you're going it on your own, you’ll spend a significant chunk of time pitching new clients and/or applying to job posts to guarantee a reliable stream of income.

Agency work tends to be much more stable, though. You generally set the number of articles you can commit to finishing each week or hours you can expect to work. You also have the option (in many cases) to turn assignments down if they interfere with your schedule or if you're not comfortable writing about a certain topic.

 

You’ll always get paid on time.

It's not necessarily always like this, but freelancers often face late payments or need to chase down clients when their invoices go unpaid. Honestly, clients forget sometimes and it's not intentional! But it happens and it's always a little annoying. You might even hear some horror stories of freelancers fighting to get clients to pay their overdue invoices.

However, agencies are much more likely to pay on a set schedule much like an office job would. They pay writers either at a specific time each month or once an assignment is completed and sent off to the client. Each agency is different, but you never have to worry about chasing down your hard-earned money.

 

Agencies handle client communication.

When you work for an agency, you rarely have to interact with a client one-on-one. Instead, you have a relationship with an agency representative who can help answer questions if you have them. This cuts down on time responding to emails and allows you more time to actually write. 

 

It’s a great way to gain experience.

For those just starting out in the world of freelance writing, working for an agency gives you a great inside view of what the work is like.

You have the chance to produce a lot of content, often across multiple platforms, and build a diverse portfolio of work. You can use that throughout your career as you move on to pitching clients later on. 

If you're not sure which niches interest you, writing for an agency opens the doors to dozens of very different industries. This helps you learn more about what you like and ultimately learn more about those niches. Later down the line, you can raise your rate based on your expertise in a specific area.

 

Is Freelance Writing for an Agency Right for You?

Whether agency work is right for you depends on what you’re currently looking for in your career. If you’re a newer freelancer, agency work can allow you to produce a large volume of work for a future portfolio while providing steady work and a consistent pay schedule. 

However, freelance writing is a competitive field; many agencies know they can get away with paying you much less than you could negotiate on your own. If you’re more well-established as a writer and have plenty of experience to help you land clients, you can make significantly more without tying yourself to an agency.

Still, the consistent work and regular pay from agency work is attractive even to writers who are further along in their careers. Unsurprisingly, there are exceptions to all of the cons listed above. If the reliability of agency work appeals to you, it’s worth looking around to see if you can find one that will allow you to work the way you want. 

 

There are pros and cons to client work and agency work alike. Ultimately, the path you take depends on what you want to get out of your writing career. No matter which you choose, you can eventually turn a significant profit by freelance writing from wherever in the world you are. 

 

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